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A box of various pieces of sushi.
A box of sushi from Lucky Robot.
Lucky Robot/Facebook

The Essential Austin Sushi Restaurants

Oh so fresh Japanese fish

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A box of sushi from Lucky Robot.
| Lucky Robot/Facebook

Austin’s sushi game is very strong, despite being a landlocked city. Look no further than award-winning chef Tyson Cole and his nationally recognized sibling spots Uchi and Uchiko. The Japanese specialty is done right in town, with sushi, sashimi, nigiri, chirashi bowls, and even rolls aplenty.

Austin’s best sushi restaurants range from casual to exclusive. Top spots include Musashino, which served as the training grounds for many of the city’s top chefs, strong offerings from trailer-turned-restaurant Kome, fun omakase spots like Otoko and Tsuke Domae, and many more.

As with all businesses right now, be sure to call ahead to make sure each restaurant is still open or if there are updates on current offerings and service models, as things are changing constantly. Follow the business’s rules, be sure to wear a mask, and tip well.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Soto Japanese Cuisine

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Rolls at the Cedar Park Japanese restaurant run the gamut from decadent with truffle to plain but dependable like tuna and salmon. There’s a second location down on South Lamar. Both are open for indoor dine-in services, there is a patio on South Lamar; takeout orders can be placed online.

Tomodachi Sushi

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The far north Japanese restaurant is a reliable spot for amazing traditional and fusion sushi (just ignore the bizarre names). Keep an eye out for the specials which are truly remarkable. The restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

Ichi-Umi Sushi

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The North Austin sushi restaurant (formerly known as Hanabi) and Haru) serves up substantial sushi for lunch and dinner. In particular, the slightly seared selection (aburi-style) is lovely. Takeout orders can be placed online or over the phone; the restaurant is opened for indoor dine-in service.

Three pieces of scored pink fish with delicate garnishes.
Sushi from Ichi-Umi Sushi.
Ichi-Umi Sushi/Facebook

Ichiban

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Seek out the Allandale traditional sushi bar with ambiance, from the koi pond to the Japanese-style low booths, where shoes must be taken off as it is a tatami-style restaurant. Most rolls can be turned into handrolls. Pickup and delivery orders can be placed online, the restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

A wooden boat with pieces of sushi rolls on it.
Sushi from Ichiban.
Ichiban/Facebook

Owners of the popular but defunct Sushi A-Go-Go turned the trailer into Kome, which serves up unique rolls, like the ode to the state Texas surf and turf with shrimp tempura and hanger steak, traditional maki, and hand-pressed sushi. The traditional offerings are stellar as is the lunchtime chirashi bowl. The restaurant is open for curbside pickup orders online.

A rectangle white plate with three pieces of sushi on it.
Sushi from Kome
Kome/Facebook

Tsuke Edomae

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It’s best to secure reservations the day for this tiny eight-seat sushi bar in Mueller they become available — unless there’s a rare opening in the waitlist. Tsuke Edomae is an immersive omakase experience from chef Michael Che (who previously operated $29 omakase spot Tsuke Honten), and at $79 per person, it’s still one of the most affordable options in town. Tsuke Edomae focuses on edomae-style sushi, which is largely unadorned. The restaurant is open for indoor dining only.

An uni piece from Tsuke Edomae
An uni piece from Tsuke Edomae
Nadia Chaudhury/EATX

Musashino Sushi Dokoro

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The sushi stalwart’s home in West Campus means more space for serving its Tokyo-style sushi. It was where many of the city’s sushi greats have trained, including Uchi’s Tyson Cole, Kome’s Také Asazu, and Fukumoto’s Kazu Fukumoto. The restaurant is open for indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

A long oval plate with four pieces of fish on it, one textured and pale, one smooth and pink, one orange with white spots, and one pink with circular green leaves on it
Sushi from Musashino.
Nadia Chaudhury/Eater Austin

Fukumoto

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Owner Kazu Fukumoto is a Musashino alum, which means he pays close attention to the cuts of fish he uses for every single piece through the East Austin restaurant. The restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

Uchi & Uchiko

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Uchi and sister restaurant Uchiko have some of the best, most inventive sushi in Austin. Prepare to spend money or opt for the more budget-friendly sake social hour. To-go orders for both restaurants can be placed online, and both restaurants are open for indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

A brown board with three pieces of sushi on it.
Sushi from Uchi.
Uchi/Facebook

Sushi|Bar ATX

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Under head chef Ambrely Ouimette, Sushi|Bar ATX is another highly coveted reservation in Austin’s omakase realm. Sushi Bar, which operates out of Bento Picnic, serves a more creative take on sushi, with garnishes like fresno chili and freshly grated wasabi, with sake or cocktail pairings available. The restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

A piece of pink sushi with black caviar and green garnish on top of a bamboo mat.
A sushi piece from Sushi Bar ATX.
Sushi Bar ATX/Facebook

Lucky Robot Japanese Kitchen

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Set aside the kitschy atmosphere for Lucky’s solid sushi, including traditional rolls and creative ones like the Star Wars-themed R2D2 and Sea-3po. The restaurant emphasizes sustainability where chef Jay Huang works only with farms and cooperatives that practice thoughtful fishing. It’s worth indulging in the dry-aged sushi too. Pickup and Door Dash delivery orders can be placed online, and there are indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

A long white plate with various sushi pieces.
Sushi from Lucky Robot.
Lucky Robot/Facebook

Fall under head sushi chef Yoshi Okai’s magical sushi spell as he cuts and prepares fish, rice, and vegetables served right on the spot to be eaten immediately. Hands are encouraged for the intimate omakase meal, and reservations are required for the indoor dining experience.

Two circularly plates each with a piece of sushi on them.
Ayu from Otoko.
Otoko/Facebook

Eurasia Sushi Bar & Seafood

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The pan-Asian menu of the Oak Hill restaurant includes a stellar sushi selection, from nigiri to rolls. Of the two additional locations, only the Cedar Park one serves sushi as well. Pickup and delivery orders can be placed online, all restaurants are open for indoor dine-in services.

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Soto Japanese Cuisine

Rolls at the Cedar Park Japanese restaurant run the gamut from decadent with truffle to plain but dependable like tuna and salmon. There’s a second location down on South Lamar. Both are open for indoor dine-in services, there is a patio on South Lamar; takeout orders can be placed online.

Tomodachi Sushi

The far north Japanese restaurant is a reliable spot for amazing traditional and fusion sushi (just ignore the bizarre names). Keep an eye out for the specials which are truly remarkable. The restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

Ichi-Umi Sushi

Three pieces of scored pink fish with delicate garnishes.
Sushi from Ichi-Umi Sushi.
Ichi-Umi Sushi/Facebook

The North Austin sushi restaurant (formerly known as Hanabi) and Haru) serves up substantial sushi for lunch and dinner. In particular, the slightly seared selection (aburi-style) is lovely. Takeout orders can be placed online or over the phone; the restaurant is opened for indoor dine-in service.

Three pieces of scored pink fish with delicate garnishes.
Sushi from Ichi-Umi Sushi.
Ichi-Umi Sushi/Facebook

Ichiban

A wooden boat with pieces of sushi rolls on it.
Sushi from Ichiban.
Ichiban/Facebook

Seek out the Allandale traditional sushi bar with ambiance, from the koi pond to the Japanese-style low booths, where shoes must be taken off as it is a tatami-style restaurant. Most rolls can be turned into handrolls. Pickup and delivery orders can be placed online, the restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

A wooden boat with pieces of sushi rolls on it.
Sushi from Ichiban.
Ichiban/Facebook

Komé

A rectangle white plate with three pieces of sushi on it.
Sushi from Kome
Kome/Facebook

Owners of the popular but defunct Sushi A-Go-Go turned the trailer into Kome, which serves up unique rolls, like the ode to the state Texas surf and turf with shrimp tempura and hanger steak, traditional maki, and hand-pressed sushi. The traditional offerings are stellar as is the lunchtime chirashi bowl. The restaurant is open for curbside pickup orders online.

A rectangle white plate with three pieces of sushi on it.
Sushi from Kome
Kome/Facebook

Tsuke Edomae

An uni piece from Tsuke Edomae
An uni piece from Tsuke Edomae
Nadia Chaudhury/EATX

It’s best to secure reservations the day for this tiny eight-seat sushi bar in Mueller they become available — unless there’s a rare opening in the waitlist. Tsuke Edomae is an immersive omakase experience from chef Michael Che (who previously operated $29 omakase spot Tsuke Honten), and at $79 per person, it’s still one of the most affordable options in town. Tsuke Edomae focuses on edomae-style sushi, which is largely unadorned. The restaurant is open for indoor dining only.

An uni piece from Tsuke Edomae
An uni piece from Tsuke Edomae
Nadia Chaudhury/EATX

Musashino Sushi Dokoro

A long oval plate with four pieces of fish on it, one textured and pale, one smooth and pink, one orange with white spots, and one pink with circular green leaves on it
Sushi from Musashino.
Nadia Chaudhury/Eater Austin

The sushi stalwart’s home in West Campus means more space for serving its Tokyo-style sushi. It was where many of the city’s sushi greats have trained, including Uchi’s Tyson Cole, Kome’s Také Asazu, and Fukumoto’s Kazu Fukumoto. The restaurant is open for indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

A long oval plate with four pieces of fish on it, one textured and pale, one smooth and pink, one orange with white spots, and one pink with circular green leaves on it
Sushi from Musashino.
Nadia Chaudhury/Eater Austin

Fukumoto

Owner Kazu Fukumoto is a Musashino alum, which means he pays close attention to the cuts of fish he uses for every single piece through the East Austin restaurant. The restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

Uchi & Uchiko

A brown board with three pieces of sushi on it.
Sushi from Uchi.
Uchi/Facebook

Uchi and sister restaurant Uchiko have some of the best, most inventive sushi in Austin. Prepare to spend money or opt for the more budget-friendly sake social hour. To-go orders for both restaurants can be placed online, and both restaurants are open for indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

A brown board with three pieces of sushi on it.
Sushi from Uchi.
Uchi/Facebook

Sushi|Bar ATX

A piece of pink sushi with black caviar and green garnish on top of a bamboo mat.
A sushi piece from Sushi Bar ATX.
Sushi Bar ATX/Facebook

Under head chef Ambrely Ouimette, Sushi|Bar ATX is another highly coveted reservation in Austin’s omakase realm. Sushi Bar, which operates out of Bento Picnic, serves a more creative take on sushi, with garnishes like fresno chili and freshly grated wasabi, with sake or cocktail pairings available. The restaurant is open for indoor dine-in service.

A piece of pink sushi with black caviar and green garnish on top of a bamboo mat.
A sushi piece from Sushi Bar ATX.
Sushi Bar ATX/Facebook

Lucky Robot Japanese Kitchen

A long white plate with various sushi pieces.
Sushi from Lucky Robot.
Lucky Robot/Facebook

Set aside the kitschy atmosphere for Lucky’s solid sushi, including traditional rolls and creative ones like the Star Wars-themed R2D2 and Sea-3po. The restaurant emphasizes sustainability where chef Jay Huang works only with farms and cooperatives that practice thoughtful fishing. It’s worth indulging in the dry-aged sushi too. Pickup and Door Dash delivery orders can be placed online, and there are indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

A long white plate with various sushi pieces.
Sushi from Lucky Robot.
Lucky Robot/Facebook

Otoko

Two circularly plates each with a piece of sushi on them.
Ayu from Otoko.
Otoko/Facebook

Fall under head sushi chef Yoshi Okai’s magical sushi spell as he cuts and prepares fish, rice, and vegetables served right on the spot to be eaten immediately. Hands are encouraged for the intimate omakase meal, and reservations are required for the indoor dining experience.

Two circularly plates each with a piece of sushi on them.
Ayu from Otoko.
Otoko/Facebook

Eurasia Sushi Bar & Seafood

The pan-Asian menu of the Oak Hill restaurant includes a stellar sushi selection, from nigiri to rolls. Of the two additional locations, only the Cedar Park one serves sushi as well. Pickup and delivery orders can be placed online, all restaurants are open for indoor dine-in services.

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