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People holding up pieces of meat with chopsticks around a round table full of bowls of broth and plates of food.
Hot pots at Soupleaf Hot Pot.
Soupleaf Hot Pot/Facebook

Where to Dip Into Hot Pot and Shabu-Shabu in Austin

From traditional dip-it-yourself bowls to already-composed options

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Hot pots at Soupleaf Hot Pot.
| Soupleaf Hot Pot/Facebook

Austin is full of delicious soups and ramen in the capital city for those days you just want something warm. But for a more interactive experience, it’s worth seeking out the city’s hot pot restaurants. Typically, hot pot dining is a social one, where diners dip and cook vegetables, meats, and other food items into a shared sizzling vessel of soups or broths. There are hot pots in Chinese and Mongolian cultures, and the Japanese version is shabu-shabu (which translates to “swish-swish,” referring to the motion of stirring meats and vegetables around in hot brothers with chopsticks).

While Austin’s hot pot and shabu-shabu scene isn’t ginormous, there are a few key restaurants offering great communal experiences. There’s the all-you-can-eat hot pots of Soupleaf Hot Pot, the new-school shabu-shabu of Ramen Tatsu-ya, and others.

By the way, Austin is about to get an additional hot pot hotspot soon: Restaurant chain K Pot Korean BBQ & Hot Pot will open in Sunset Valley and Arboretum (hopefully) this year.

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Miyo Yakitori & Sushi

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For a less interactive experience, the Japanese restaurant in the Jefferson Center neighborhood offers sukiyaki, where the meats and vegetables served in a simmering bowl of savory broth. The as-the-menu-describes-it Japanese hot pots includes beef and tofu options, both with glass noodles. Takeout orders can be placed online; there are DoorDash, Grubhub, and Uber Eats deliveries; there are indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

Hotpot Alley

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For a truly customizable experience, head to this Chinese restaurant near Anderson Mill. Hotpot lets people pick their choice of meats, broths, and toppings with a grocery shopping-like experience, complete with a basket to hold everything. Soup base options include Sichuan, tom yum, and tomato. For those who want to mix-and-match, there are pots with dividers Pro-tip: get unlimited access to the condiment bar. Takeout orders can be placed online; there are indoor dine-in services.

Basil Thai

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While the Parmer Square pan-Asian restaurant and tea house doesn’t offer a full-on hot pot experience, it does have a similar option. The individual hot spot servings come already cooked with your choice of meats and mains, Thai-style broths, and vegetables. Takeout orders can be placed online; there are indoor dine-in services.

DipDipDip Tatsu-Ya

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From the team behind the ultra-popular Ramen Tatsu-ya, the higher-end Japanese restaurant in Crestview focuses on new-school shabu-shabu. Go big and order one of the omakase options with a variety of ingredients, and make sure to save room for noodles at the end. There are indoor dine-in services.

Soupleaf Hot Pot

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The Highland Chinese restaurant — found within the pan-Asian-dining-hot-spot in the Crescent shopping center — focuses on all-you-can-eat Cantonese-style hot pot. There are five soup bases, such as the spicy Chinese mala, miso dashi, and classic tonkotsu, The restaurant boasts a buffet ranging from vegetables to noodles and even fish balls, and then there are meats and seafood (brisket, pork belly, New Zealand lamb, clams, shrimp paste, scallops) available at additional a la carte prices. There are indoor dine-in services.

Miyo Yakitori & Sushi

For a less interactive experience, the Japanese restaurant in the Jefferson Center neighborhood offers sukiyaki, where the meats and vegetables served in a simmering bowl of savory broth. The as-the-menu-describes-it Japanese hot pots includes beef and tofu options, both with glass noodles. Takeout orders can be placed online; there are DoorDash, Grubhub, and Uber Eats deliveries; there are indoor and outdoor dine-in services.

Hotpot Alley

For a truly customizable experience, head to this Chinese restaurant near Anderson Mill. Hotpot lets people pick their choice of meats, broths, and toppings with a grocery shopping-like experience, complete with a basket to hold everything. Soup base options include Sichuan, tom yum, and tomato. For those who want to mix-and-match, there are pots with dividers Pro-tip: get unlimited access to the condiment bar. Takeout orders can be placed online; there are indoor dine-in services.

Basil Thai

While the Parmer Square pan-Asian restaurant and tea house doesn’t offer a full-on hot pot experience, it does have a similar option. The individual hot spot servings come already cooked with your choice of meats and mains, Thai-style broths, and vegetables. Takeout orders can be placed online; there are indoor dine-in services.

DipDipDip Tatsu-Ya

From the team behind the ultra-popular Ramen Tatsu-ya, the higher-end Japanese restaurant in Crestview focuses on new-school shabu-shabu. Go big and order one of the omakase options with a variety of ingredients, and make sure to save room for noodles at the end. There are indoor dine-in services.

Soupleaf Hot Pot

The Highland Chinese restaurant — found within the pan-Asian-dining-hot-spot in the Crescent shopping center — focuses on all-you-can-eat Cantonese-style hot pot. There are five soup bases, such as the spicy Chinese mala, miso dashi, and classic tonkotsu, The restaurant boasts a buffet ranging from vegetables to noodles and even fish balls, and then there are meats and seafood (brisket, pork belly, New Zealand lamb, clams, shrimp paste, scallops) available at additional a la carte prices. There are indoor dine-in services.

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