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The Breakfast Taco Could Become an Official State Dish of Texas

If House Member Stephanie Klick's bill passes, that is

A breakfast taco from Valentina’s Tex Mex BBQ
A breakfast taco from Valentina’s Tex Mex BBQ
Valentina's Tex Mex BBQ/Facebook

The breakfast taco as an official state dish of Texas? Texas House Member Stephanie Klick of Fort Worth thinks it should be. She proposed a bill to the Texas State Legislature asking to designate the morning dish as "the official state breakfast item of Texas.” This isn’t to be confused with the official state dish, which is chili.

Her resolution calls breakfast tacos "one of the fundamental building blocks of Mexican cuisine," and notes how "it has quickly became popular with both native Texans and delighted visitors from across the nation." Klick’s full proposed bill follows below.

This bill is unrelated to taco journalist Mando Rayo’s push to make tacos the official state dish. “It should be the taco, not just breakfast tacos," Rayo told Eater when asked about the current proposed bill. In that vein, he launched a petition to replace chili (the current state dish) with tacos, which he plans on taking to the Texas State Legislature.

H.C.R. No. 92, a.k.a. Breakfast Taco Resolution

WHEREAS, Texas is renowned for its distinctive and delicious foods, and our state has put its brand on breakfast with a versatile item that is beloved from the Panhandle to the Rio Grande: the breakfast taco; and

WHEREAS, The taco has been one of the fundamental building blocks of Mexican cuisine for well over a century and possibly much longer; using savory breakfast foods such as eggs and potatoes as taco fillings was a natural idea, and an account of pairing bacon with a tortilla dates to the 1850s in a chronicle of a Texas to California cattle drive; references in the press to tacos eaten for breakfast are found beginning in the mid-20th century: in May 1959, the San Antonio Express and News reported on a taco shop on the West Side that featured egg tacos, and the El Paso Herald-Post reported in May 1962 that gubernatorial candidate Don Yarborough had tacos for breakfast while on the campaign trail; one of the earliest uses of the term "breakfast taco" comes from a 1975 newspaper article about a food tour of San Antonio; and

WHEREAS, More recently, a spirited debate has arisen over which part of the state originated the breakfast taco; many Texans of a certain age have fond memories, dating back decades, of being served tacos for breakfast by their mothers and grandmothers in San Antonio, South Texas, and the Rio Grande Valley, and by the 1960s, the "taco for breakfast" could be found farther north in the Lone Star State, on school menus in Kerrville and Seguin; some food writers and restaurateurs have claimed that Austin originated the term "breakfast taco," if not the food itself, which has led to an energetic dissent from residents of San Antonio and other regions and municipalities around the Lone Star State; and

WHEREAS, No matter where or when it got its start, the breakfast taco has quickly become popular with both native Texans and delighted visitors from across the nation; as long as it includes a tortilla and is eaten for breakfast, the breakfast taco can range from the simplest (tortilla and egg) to the traditional (tortilla and machacado con huevo) to the innovative (tortilla, eggs, and hot dogs) to the most extravagant (tortilla plus whatever else is on the menu), and it can be enjoyed in every corner of the state; and

WHEREAS, Whether purchased at a drive-through in Fort Worth, ordered at a restaurant in Corpus Christi, or served by a loving grandmother in Del Rio, the breakfast taco has become a signature Texas food on a par with barbecue and chicken-fried steak, and it is enjoyed by countless residents of the Lone Star State each morning as the perfect way to start their day; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the 85th Legislature of the State of Texas hereby designate the breakfast taco as the official state breakfast item of Texas.

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